Recommended Reading:

ARTICLE: Weight science: evaluating the evidence for a paradigm shift by Linda Bacon https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3041737/

BOOK: Body Respect by Linda Bacon & Lucy Aphramor

BOOK: The Religion of Thinness: Satisfying the Spiritual Hungers Behind Women’s Obsession with Food and Weight by Michelle M. Lelwica

Sources:

BOOK: Let the Bones Dance: Embodiment and the Body of Christ, by Marcia Mount Shoop

ARTICLE: Weight science: evaluating the evidence for a paradigm shift by Linda Bacon https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3041737/

ARTICLE: Weighed down by stigma: How weight-based social identity threat contributes to weight gain and poor health by Jeffrey M. Hunger, Brenda Major, Alison Blodorn, and Carol T. Miller. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5720363/

ARTICLE The Experience of Being Obese and the Many Consequences of Stigma by Jane Ogden and Cecelia Clementi. http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2010/429098

ARTICLE: Changes in perceived weight discrimination among Americans, 1995-1996 through 2004-2006 by Tatiana Andreyeva, Rebecca M. Puhl, Kelly D. Brownell http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/oby.2008.35

Depth Citations:

Research shows that “people of all ages, sexes, and from a number of different cultures stigmatize and subsequently discriminate against obese people.”[1] These stereotypes are independent of the body size of the person doing the rating[2] and independent of the large person’s competency.[3] Weight based stigma is “pervasive and intensifying,”[4] having more than doubled between 1995 and 2006.[5] As an acceptable type of discrimination (legal in 49 of 50 US states), there are virtually no legal or social consequences for discriminating against a person based on the size of their body. Research also shows that, despite what some believe,[6] stigma does not motivate weight reduction, in fact, weight based stigma has been shown to negatively impact mental health,[7] increase binge eating,[8] [9] decrease use of health care services,[10] and increase the likelihood of weight gain over time.[11] Stigmatization can be driven by a belief that weight can be controlled through willpower and behavior modification, but long-term studies repeatedly show that after a period of deprivation, virtually all bodies will return to their beginning weight or heavier,[12] often with poorer overall health due to the damaging effects of weight cycling.[13]


[1] Jane Ogden and Cecelia Clementi, “The Experience of Being Obese and the Many Consequences of Stigma,” Journal Of Obesity (2010): 2.

[2] Tiggeman and Rothblum, 1988, cited by Ogden and Cecelia Clementi, “The Experience of Being Obese and the Many Consequences of Stigma,” Journal Of Obesity (2010): 2.

[3] Larken & Pines, 1979, cited by Ogden and Cecelia Clementi, “The Experience of Being Obese and the Many Consequences of Stigma,” Journal Of Obesity (2010): 2.

[4] Andreyeva, Puhl, & Brownell, 2008; Vartanian, Pinkus, & Smyth, 2014 cited by Jeffery M. Hunger, et al., “Weighed Down by Stigma: How Weight-Based Social Identity Threat Contributes to Weight Gain and Poor Health,” Social & Personality Psychology Compass 9, no. 6 (2015): 255.

[5] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18356847

[6] Bayer, 2008, cited by Jeffery M. Hunger, et al., “Weighed Down by Stigma: How Weight-Based Social Identity Threat Contributes to Weight Gain and Poor Health,” Social & Personality Psychology Compass 9, no. 6 (2015): 255.

[7] Bacon & Aphramor, 2011, cited by Jeffery M. Hunger, et al., “Weighed Down by Stigma: How Weight-Based Social Identity Threat Contributes to Weight Gain and Poor Health,” Social & Personality Psychology Compass 9, no. 6 (2015): 256.

[8] Almeida, Savoy, & Boxer, 2011, cited by Jeffery M. Hunger, et al., “Weighed Down by Stigma: How Weight-Based Social Identity Threat Contributes to Weight Gain and Poor Health,” Social & Personality Psychology Compass 9, no. 6 (2015): 255.

[9] Rebecca L. Pearl, Rebecca M. Puhl, and Kelly D. Brownell, “Positive media portrayals of obese persons: Impact on attitudes and image preferences,” Health Psychology 31, no. 6 (2012):  821

[10] Ibid.

[11] Hunger & Tomiyama, 2014, cited by Jeffery M. Hunger, et al., “Weighed Down by Stigma: How Weight-Based Social Identity Threat Contributes to Weight Gain and Poor Health,” Social & Personality Psychology Compass 9, no. 6 (2015): 255.

[12] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3041737/

[13] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3041737/

 

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