questions aren't connections

It’s normal for parents to worry about kids, as they navigate shared spaces, learning, and the social aspects of growing up. Parents typically find that information can- temporarily, at least- soothe some of their worry. The temptation, then, is to have LOTS of questions for kids at the end of the day, but for kids, soothing comes when an adult can join them in a space without expectations to report, perform, or explain. A simple shift from Q & A to observing and responding to a child’s nonverbal communication can help both kids and adults relax, and create an atmosphere in which kids who are verbal processers can share more.

Open Ended Play

Next time you are toy-shopping for sons, daughters, grandkids, or nieces/nephews remember to make space for toys for unscripted play.

Lots of toys come with an implicit script- that is, a way the toy is “supposed” to be played with: it might be a role the child automatically plays when playing with the toy (like most character-branded toys) or a generic script that’s followed during play (like sports, craft kits, board games, and video games). Unscripted play includes toys like unbranded dress-up clothing, play houses/kitchens/stores, blocks and building sets without build instructions, etc. Unscripted play allows kids to communicate in the language they know, and if you listen and join, you can speak it too.

Support for Parents
Parenting can be overwhelming and it isn’t something you have to do alone. If the idea of reducing the number of questions you ask your child feels really anxiety-provoking, consider giving yourself the gift of a check-in with a therapist or parenting coach. Recent research done by Yale University suggests that a short course of meetings between a parent and a therapist can soothe parents and, by extension, reduce anxiety and anxious behaviors in children.

 

 Anxiety about what is unknown can make us want to ask lots of questions- and all those questions can put a lot of pressure on a child to relieve *our* anxiety. - Sometimes the best way to connect is to scrap the questions and to bring a topic up gently ("I was thinking about you during your recess today."), Express empathy ("I know some days that's hard"), and require nothing. ...Trying a mashup of digital and analog doodles here. Like these fonts? They are free to download for Patreon supporters! (Link in profile)....

 

Anxiety about what is unknown can make us want to ask lots of questions- and all those questions can put a lot of pressure on a child to relieve *our* anxiety. Sometimes the best way to connect is to scrap the questions and to bring a topic up gently (“I was thinking about you during your recess today.”), Express empathy (“I know some days that’s hard”), and require nothing.

Text of this image reads:

/ Number one / when then’s / scrap “if then” consequences for “when then,” privileges for example, “if you don’t stop” versus “when you stop…” Number two / stop asking questions / when you don’t require an answer, words are more likely. Example “I was thinking about you today during your test” Number three / you have 30 seconds / is normal for attention to shift. Don’t try to force adult-style talks. Number four / empathy / reflect compassionately. Example “I know that was really hard” Number five / play / enjoy each other without distraction. Both children and adults experience play is intimacy. A child feels connected via play.

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