Positive Childhood Experiences help build resiliency to future adverse experiences

By now, most counselors, pediatricians, teachers, and other people who work with children know about ACES: The “Adverse Childhood Experiences” scale. ACE’s predict, based on measuring the number of traumatic or adverse events experienced, which kids are likely to struggle developmentally and emotionally as they mature.  (You can take the ACES quiz here).

New results from a survey based on a study of 6188 adults at John Hopkins shows that there are seven childhood experiences that can be statistically linked to good mental health in adults.
New results from a survey based on a study of 6188 adults at Johns Hopkins shows that there are 7 childhood experiences that can be statistically linked to good mental health in adults.

 

What has been less well understood is why a small percentage of kids with high ACE scores have normal development and good adult emotional health. What factors created a level of resiliency in these kids that helped them to survive and thrive despite difficult childhoods?

Supporting Kids through COVID via this data on PCEs

A therapist-designed activity book created to help kids process COVID-19 and thrive beyond quarantine

This PCE study was the inspiration for my book Covid Kid’s Activity Book – A Workbook for Kids and Families to Build Community and Resilience through Quarantine and Beyond available now in print and instant digital download. This workbook for ages 4-11 is designed to help kids process, understand, and integrate the PCE’s they are experiencing, even in the midst of a pandemic. This may help kids grow resilience to current and future adversity.

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In 2019 researchers at Johns Hopkins University published results of the first large scale study that sought to identify “Protective Childhood Experiences” that acted counter to traumatic experiences. The Seven Protective Childhood Experiences (PCE’s) they identified (illustrated below) are categories of childhood/adolescent experiences that are connected to improved mental health and social connectedness in adults.

How do we move toward learning to develop resiliency in childhood?

Even before researchers defined ACE’s and demonstrated the link between high ACE scores and lower high school graduation rates, increased mental health diagnoses, higher rates of incarceration, and other poor outcomes, there has been an enormous focus on decreasing adverse childhood experiences.

This study helps shape research moving in an additional direction: how to support kids who have experienced one or more traumatic events, and kids who have not yet experienced a traumatic event but will in the future. Could PCE’s help researchers identify ways to help grow resilience in kids who are then able to become healthier adults?

Positive Childhood Experiences help build resiliency to future adverse experiences

Kids who experience many PCE’s learn to trust the support of social connections, and social connectedness is linked to adult mental health. Adult survey respondents who reported high levels of adulthood social and emotional support (i.e. family, partners, and friend circles they trusted, were open with, and looked to for support) were more likely to have experienced a high number of PCE’s during their childhood.

 Kids who experience many PCE’s during childhood become adults who can seek support and get care- and adults who can seek support and get care have improved symptoms even if mental illness is present. 

Survey respondents with high levels of adulthood social and emotional support were more likely to have high PCE scores

 

 

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Positive Childhood Experiences help build resiliency to future adverse experiences

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Researcher Dr. Christina Bethell proposes PCE's help build resiliency to future adverse experiences

The relationship between PCE’s in childhood and good mental health in adults is dose-responsive; that means the more PCE’s a child gets the better their adult mental health is likely to be.

the more PCS a child gets the better their adult mental health is likely to be
PCE’s improve adult mental health

 

7 Positive Childhood Experiences

1. Ability to talk with family about feelings.

Positive Childhood Experiences help build resiliency to future adverse experiences

2. Felt experience that family is supportive in difficult times.

Positive Childhood Experiences help build resiliency to future adverse experiences

3. Enjoyment in participation in community traditions.

Positive Childhood Experiences help build resiliency to future adverse experiences

4. Feeling of belonging in high school.

Positive Childhood Experiences help build resiliency to future adverse experiences

5. Feeling of being supported by friends.

Positive Childhood Experiences help build resiliency to future adverse experiences

6. Having at least two non-parent adults who genuinely care.

Positive Childhood Experiences help build resiliency to future adverse experiences

7. Feeling safe and protected by an adult at home.

Positive Childhood Experiences help build resiliency to future adverse experiences

 

Original summary of this illustration: Until now, research on the impact that childhood experiences have on adult mental health has focused on adverse experiences. This week, Johns Hopkins researchers published significant new research demonstrating 7 positive experiences, that when experienced regularly in childhood, correlate to adults who are less likely to experience depression and poor mental health.

study authored by: Christina Bethell et. al. “Positive Childhood Experiences (Free Full Text Article)

Image Description for Visually Impaired Readers
Handwritten text: Identifying positive childhood experiences that shape mental health in adults

Handwritten text: new results from a survey-based study of 6,188 adults at Johns Hopkins shows seven childhood experiences linked to good mental health and adults.  We know the effects of ACES (adverse childhood experiences) but how do we move from data on reducing trauma toward learning how to develop resiliency starting in childhood? This study suggests that not just reducing aces but increasing PCE’s contributes to growing resilient kids able to become healthier adults. Read more in JAMA pediatrics article 2749336. Survey respondents with high levels of adulthood social and emotional support were more likely to have high PCEs. Lead researcher Dr Christina Bethell and co-authors propose that kids with high PCE’s become adults who are able to seek and get care and support, which improves symptoms even if mental health illness is present. The relationship between PCE’s and good mental health is dose-responsive.  The more a child gets, the better adult health.

PCES:

One. Ability to talk with family about feelings. (Handdrawn black-ink doodled image of child talking to adult)

Two. Felt experience that family is supportive and difficult times. (Handdrawn black-ink doodled image of child holding paper being encouraged by an adult)

Three. Enjoyment and participation in community traditions. (Handdrawn black-ink doodled image of family around a campfire)

Four. Feeling of belonging in high school. (Handdrawn black-ink doodled image of two kids playing musical instruments)

Five. Feeling of being supported by friends. (Handdrawn black-ink doodled image of a phone showing supportive texts)

Six. Having at least two non-parent adults who genuinely care. (Handdrawn black-ink doodled image of a child in sports gear being encouraged by a coach)

Seven. Feeling safe and protected by an adult at home. (Handdrawn black-ink doodled image of an adult protecting a child from a barking dog)

 

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Positive Childhood Experiences help build resiliency to future adverse experiencesPositive Childhood Experiences help build resiliency to future adverse experiences

Positive Childhood Experiences help build resiliency to future adverse experiences

Positive Childhood Experiences help build resiliency to future adverse experiences

Positive Childhood Experiences help build resiliency to future adverse experiences

Positive Childhood Experiences help build resiliency to future adverse experiences

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One thought on “7 Positive Childhood Experiences (PCE’s) that Shape Adult Health and Resiliency – Illustrated”

  1. Excellent! Some of these are intuitive and I am grateful we have worked to instill in our 3 grandsons whose mother died when they were young. Excellent research!

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