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DBT Printables: Bingo Worksheet & DBT Skills Cheat Sheet

I believe that some resources used in Mental Health treatment are unnecessarily cold, clinical, or technical. These hard-to-relate-to resources may risk pushing people away instead of inviting them to engage in both a healing relationship with their therapist and with information that could help their recovery.

My printable resources like this DBT card are different. Consciously designed to integrate the fundamental concepts and package them in an approachable, non-clinical, non-threatening way, these DBT inspired worksheets can make diary cards, homework printables, and skills-practicing as easy and fun as activity books.

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Rainbow of Emotional Regulation – A Social Emotional Learning Printable Infographic

All of us have some resiliency to cope with challenges. When we encounter difficult experiences that take us past the range of our ability to tolerate, the ways we tend to respond fall into one of two categories: those of us who get agitated, and those of us who shut down.

Emotional regulation refers to our ability to stay present, engaged, and able to listen and learn despite challenges. My rainbow of emotional regulation is a social-emotional learning resource that can help teach this concept in the classroom, in counseling sessions, or at home.

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What to Say When You Don’t Know What to Say in Therapy

Sometimes, even if you really like your therapist, it can be really difficult to talk in therapy. Silence can be uncomfortable, but silence can tell us a lot about ourselves and our relationship with the person we are silent with. When you don’t know what to say, or feel at a loss for words, here’s an illustrated guide to 5 things you can do instead.

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How Protest & Despair Responses Shape Adult Relationships

Although research on protest and despair has traditionally centered on the experiences of infants and young children, humans continue to respond to crisis with protest, despair, (and detachment) throughout our lives. Unlike infants, adults have years of experience that tells us that one method or the other does a better job of getting our needs met or protecting us from further harm, and over time that method becomes our patterned response.

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