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If You Sprinkle: Stewardship of Public Spaces + Social Justice

Public restrooms aren’t a hot topic to blog about, but all of us have had the experience of “noping out” of a public bathroom because it was just too gross to use. Of, if we were desperate, perhaps we took some effort to clean things up, piled a layer of protective toilet paper on vulnerable surfaces, or maybe just hovered.

But what if we didn’t have the physical ability to do either? Should only bodies that are able to clean, cover surfaces, and/or squat get access to shared facilities?

If You Sprinkle: Stewardship of Public Spaces + Social Justice
The text of this image reads: “if you sprinkle when you tinkle please don’t assume that other bodies have the privilege of squatting or the physical ability to clean up your urine.”

[Click here to jump to a detailed image description.]

Ableism in Action

These questions directly relate to ableism. Ableism is society’s negative stigma around or unwillingness to accommodate people with disabilities. Ableism often leads to inaccessible and unwelcoming environments for those with disabilities. Much of our world was created by and for able-bodied people, and despite legislation that calls for a change, much of our world continues to create difficulties for people with disabilities. 

It’s easy to blame architects, builders, and yes, even bloggers for facilities and resources that aren’t easy to use for people with different bodies, but if you’ve ever used a public facility, you too bear a responsibility for maintaining spaces that accommodate all bodies. 

Think about the spaces you visit on a daily basis: are they designed in a way that allows access to people of all abilities? Do they allow for wheelchairs or other assistive devices to navigate in the provided spaces? Is it safe and hygienic? Also consider, would it feel welcoming and (socially/environmentally) open to all people, or would someone who is differently abled feel uncomfortable in that space?

Resisting ableism in our society looks like first, recognizing ableist ideas that exist in our society as a whole and in our own personal worldview. Advocacy can look like embracing practices and supporting policies that promote equal and equitable access for all people.

Everyday Social Justice

Social justice makes the news when it’s grand gestures, but the impact individuals can have on cultural shifts in social justice starts with ordinary stewardship of the way our words and actions impact other people. This kind of work begins when we begin to mindfully consider how other bodies exist in spaces we share, and how our actions might impact their use of those resources.

Making sure we leave a public restroom in the same – or better – condition than we found it is a way to help ensure all bodies have access to the basic facilities those of us in able bodies are able to use. It is an everyday action of social justice that recognizes and resists ableism, promoting equality in a small – but impactful – way. 

 Want to Make a Statement?

This art is available to print! Buy a digital PDF to hang as a flyer, purchase stickers to place on gear for the world to see (both are linked below), or become a patron to attain all-access for this image.

This image is available for purchase as stickers

Sprinkle image as a sticker

Ableism in Action

These questions directly relate to ableism. Ableism is society’s negative stigma around or unwillingness to accommodate people with disabilities. Ableism often leads to inaccessible and unwelcoming environments for those with disabilities. Much of our world was created by and for able-bodied people, and despite legislation that calls for a change, much of our world continues to create difficulties for people with disabilities. 

It’s easy to blame architects, builders, and yes, even bloggers for facilities and resources that aren’t easy to use for people with different bodies, but if you’ve ever used a public facility, you too bear a responsibility for maintaining spaces that accommodate all bodies. 

Think about the spaces you visit on a daily basis: are they designed in a way that allows access to people of all abilities? Do they allow for wheelchairs or other assistive devices to navigate in the provided spaces? Is it safe and hygienic? Also consider, would it feel welcoming and (socially/environmentally) open to all people, or would someone who is differently abled feel uncomfortable in that space?

Resisting ableism in our society looks like first, recognizing ableist ideas that exist in our society as a whole and in our own personal worldview. Advocacy can look like embracing practices and supporting policies that promote equal and equitable access for all people.

Download a Printable PDF of this Ablism-Awareness Poster

Making sure a restroom stall is in good shape before you leave it is a way to make sure equal access (and social justice) is provided for all bodies.

Or get All-Access as a $5/mo Patron

Everyday Social Justice

Social justice makes the news when it’s grand gestures, but the impact individuals can have on cultural shifts in social justice starts with ordinary stewardship of the way our words and actions impact other people. This kind of work begins when we begin to mindfully consider how other bodies exist in spaces we share, and how our actions might impact their use of those resources.

Making sure we leave a public restroom in the same – or better – condition than we found it is a way to help ensure all bodies have access to the basic facilities those of us in able bodies are able to use. It is an everyday action of social justice that recognizes and resists ableism, promoting equality in a small – but impactful – way. 

 Want to Make a Statement?

This art is available to print! Buy a digital PDF to hang as a flyer, purchase stickers to place on gear for the world to see (both are linked below), or become a patron to attain all-access for this image.

Detailed Image Description for Screen Readers:

Image of a hand drawn white toilet seat on a blue background, from the perspective of looking down at the toilet. The toilet seat has yellow urine splashed on it. Over the image is text written in red that reads, “If you sprinkle when you tinkle.” Underneath, in black text, is written, “Please don’t assume that other bodies have the privilege of squatting or the physical ability to clean up your urine.”

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